Friday, September 23, 2016

Homeschool Weekly - Welcome Fall Edition

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Homeschool Weekly - Welcome Fall Edition on Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

Homeschool news  . . . Thankfully, we were able to be home during the days (except for Tuesday, which is normal) this week, and that made it much easier to concentrate on schoolwork and get things done.  Kennady worked on History, Health, Science, and (reluctantly) Math.

After some discussion, we made one change to how we've scheduled her schoolwork. She prefers to focus on one subject and just plow through that rather than doing a little bit of everything every day. So . . . since she has already been working hard at getting through the Health text, we decided that we would hold off on starting The Power in Your Hands (her Composition curriculum) until she is finished with Health. Also, for now she'll be doing Science only one or two days a week. I'm not sure how long that will work out, but for the first couple of units we're pretty sure it will. Math is her least favorite and most troublesome subject, so in order to help her retain what she learns I am insisting that she work on that every day. And of course the Notgrass course is designed for five days a week and we are sticking to that schedule as much as we are able. We'll see how it goes for the next few weeks!

Other news . . . We had a great weekend, going as a family (and taking along one of Landon's friends) to the UpRise music festival in Shippensburg. We all enjoyed the concerts, and Kennady was very excited to be able to get her picture with members of Family Force 5 and get autographs from them and from the band Disciple. She got those autographs on one of her vintage records, and apparently the guys were a bit reluctant to write on the vinyl as they joked that it would ruin the value of the 98-year-old record!

Homeschool Weekly - Welcome Fall Edition on Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

Then our week was pretty much the standard routine of work, school, CAP, and music. Regular midweek activities started at church this week, so the kids were glad to be back at youth group.

It was a great week for mail - I'd ordered a Blue Jays t-shirt and hat for myself and that package arrived; and then a couple days later, my new Fire HD8 arrived!

Homeschool Weekly - Welcome Fall Edition on Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com
The kids leave the stickers on their hats for some reason, but I'm old school
and take them off. ;-)

Homeschool Weekly - Welcome Fall Edition on Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com
Thank you for the warm welcome, Fire!

What's Important . . .

Setting goals and evaluating our students' progress with more than just academics in mind. (Read more HERE.)

From the High School Lesson Book - Setting Goals and Measuring Success on Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

And knowing that our mission as homeschoolers is primarily to disciple our children and give them a strong foundation in Biblical truth. (Read more HERE.)

Great are the works of the LORD, studied by all who delight in them. ~from Psalm 111 on Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

I recommend . . . stopping by The Homeschool Post, where this month's focus is on homeschooling for free (or at least keeping your cost down!). My contribution, 5 Strategies for Stretching Your Homeschool Dollar, appeared this week.

5 Strategies for Stretching Your Homeschool Dollar - keeping the cost of homeschooling under control! Here are some tips to help - on The Homeschool Post @ hsbapost.com courtesy of Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

One excellent source for curriculum and homeschool resources is SchoolhouseTeachers.com. Considering that you get access to over 250 courses for all grades and in all subject areas, that's a great way to keep your homeschool costs low! And especially through the end of this month, when they are offering a special pricing deal.



On my blogs last week . . .

Here on Homeschool Coffee Break:

52 Lists #38 - Our Family Traditions
Virtual Refrigerator - Autumn Art
Strategies for Stretching Your Homeschool Dollar on The Homeschool Post
Book Review: The Pray-ers
From the High School Lesson Book - Setting Goals and Measuring Success


And on my book blog, Just A Second:

Recent Reads - The Pray-ers
(Not So) Wordless Wednesday - Record Collection
Teaser Tuesday - Caught in the Middle
What I'm Reading - September 19, 2016
Scripture and a Snapshot - Study the Works of the Lord


Just A Second is where I share book reviews and other book-related things, and update on what's on my bookshelf. This week I finished and reviewed The Pray-ers, Book One: Troubles by Mark S. Mirza; and I've been reading:

The Pharaoh's Daughter: A Treasures of the Nile Novel by Mesu Andrews
Caught in the Middle by Regina Jennings
A Tapestry of Secrets by Sarah Loudin Thomas


A parting shot . . . Yesterday was the first day of fall, so I thought it would be okay if I had maple leaf cookies for breakfast.
Homeschool Weekly - Welcome Fall Edition on Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com




 Weekly Wrap-Up   Biblical Womanhood - Christian Fellowship Weekend

  

I will be linking up at the Weekly Wrap-Up hosted by Weird, Unsocialized Homeschoolers, at Christian Fellowship Weekend hosted by Biblical Womanhoodand at The Homeschool Mother's Journal hosted by NextGenHomeschool.

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 ©2006-2016 Homeschool Coffee Break. All rights reserved. All text, photographs, artwork, and other content may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form without the written consent of the author. http://kympossibleblog.blogspot.com/

52 Lists #38 - Our Family Traditions

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52 Lists #38 - Our Family Traditions on Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

This week our 52 Lists assignment is to list our family's traditions. (See details and more lists at 52 Lists at Beauty Full Slow.)

I've noticed that often when asked about family traditions, most people react at first by thinking they don't really have any. Or at least that their traditions aren't anything out of the ordinary. But at its simplest, a tradition is a custom or information that is handed down from generation to generation. I found an interesting article on Genealogy.com that discussed family traditions and their importance (see it here: Family Traditions: The Ties That Bind), which contained this simple definition:
. . . traditions were what people carried with them and part of what people wanted their families to become.
It went on to talk about how family traditions often are related to the holidays or special occasions, and are more than just the everyday family routines such as a nightly bedtime story or who sits where at the dinner table.  So with that in mind, here are some of what I consider our family traditions, organized by the special occasions they've grown up around.

Birthdays
  • whenever we phone an extended family member on their birthday, we try to sing the worst possible version of the Happy Birthday song we can. Goofy voices, off-key, horrid "harmonies", everyone in a different key or timing, and odd background noises. This one is from my side of the family, and started when I was a teen, I think. We're not sure. It's a weird and hilarious tradition though!
  • we don't always have a party, but the birthday kid does always get to request their birthday dinner and the kind of birthday cake (or dessert) they'd like. My mom used to do that for me and my siblings. When the birthday person is ME, the family takes me out for dinner.
  • Some birthdays are milestones and in our family, Thirteen is a big one. That was the age at which each of our kids was first allowed to drink coffee, and we made a huge deal out of it!
52 Lists #38 - Our Family Traditions on Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com 52 Lists #38 - Our Family Traditions on Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com


Graduation and School Occasions
  • I try to take first day of school pictures. My students have not always been cooperative, but we do our best.
  • the graduating student gets to choose the family vacation that summer (within certain budgetary guidelines, of course! See my post: The Summer of Landon)
52 Lists #38 - Our Family Traditions on Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

52 Lists #38 - Our Family Traditions on Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com


Other Annual Events
  • we bake pies for Pi Day!
  • we make sure to eat Lucky Charms for breakfast on St. Patrick's Day!
  • we have a family Stanley Cup play-off pool.
52 Lists #38 - Our Family Traditions on Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

Thanksgiving
  • we celebrate Thanksgiving on both the Canadian and the US dates, and with a deep-fried turkey on at least one of those occasions. (See my post: Thanksgiving Inspiration from Canada)
  • we start decorating for Christmas on Thanksgiving Day
  • on the day before Thanksgiving, my hubby's hockey league hosts "Gobble In the Lot" which is a tailgate/potluck style Thanksgiving dinner for the players and their families. 
  • when I was a kid my mom tried to take a family picture of everyone at the dinner table, and we kids would always try to "ruin" it by freezing with a forkful of food halfway into our mouth, or with a drinking glass to our lips. That became a traditional holiday picture in my family, and now the next generation is proudly carrying it on!
Thanksgiving Inspiration From Canada on Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com #Thanksgiving #Canada

Christmas
  • we always have Christmas-themed puzzles on the go throughout the holidays. 
  • we watch A Christmas Carol (the Alistair Sim version) on Christmas Eve, and It's A Wonderful Life on Christmas Day. And we love to watch Christmas movies and specials together throughout the season, which is special because we don't watch TV as a family much during the rest of the year.
  • the tree stays up until Epiphany. 
  • A couple of years ago, we intentionally planned a new tradition, and started our Family 12 Days of Christmas (See my posts: Our Family's Twelve Days of Christmas and On the Twelfth Day of Christmas)
12 Days of Christmas

Family traditions counter alienation and confusion. They help us define who we are; they provide something steady, reliable and safe in a confusing world. ~Susan Lieberman
What are some of your family's traditions? Leave a comment and let me know, and visit Beauty Full Slow to see more.

52 lists with Chasing Slow
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 ©2006-2016 Homeschool Coffee Break. All rights reserved. All text, photographs, artwork, and other content may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form without the written consent of the author. http://kympossibleblog.blogspot.com/

Thursday, September 22, 2016

Virtual Refrigerator - Autumn Art

This post contains affiliate links - using affiliate links from Homeschool Coffee Break helps fuel this blog and our homeschool - thank you!
Autumn Art on the Virtual Refrigerator - an art link-up hosted by Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

Welcome to another edition of the Virtual Refrigerator! Thank you for joining me and my co-hosts for our weekly art link-up. We all cordially invite you to add your link sharing artwork that's on your Virtual Refrigerator and then hop over to the other blogs and admire what's on their Fridges too!

Today is the first day of autumn, so I am putting up a collection of fall-themed art on my Virtual Fridge to celebrate. And I'm pretty sure that sometime today I'll find a way to enjoy something pumpkin spice, apple cider, or maple flavored.

Leaf rubbings are a great simple project for early in the fall - before the leaves get too crunchy!

Autumn Art on the Virtual Refrigerator - an art link-up hosted by Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

I saw this idea at a student art exhibition a couple years ago, and we still haven't made our own, but it's on my wishlist. The tree trunk is made from a brown paper bag, and the leaves are puzzle pieces painted orange and yellow.

Autumn Art on the Virtual Refrigerator - an art link-up hosted by Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

This was a leaf drawing in chalk pastel that Kennady made a couple years ago. Can you tell that it's made from a hand tracing? (Featured here: Virtual Refrigerator - Autumn Leaves)

Autumn Art on the Virtual Refrigerator - an art link-up hosted by Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com
Autumn Leaves by KAT, November 2014

More chalk pastel autumn art.

Autumn Art on the Virtual Refrigerator - an art link-up hosted by Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

Probably my favorite autumn piece - based on a work by Gustav Klimt. You can see the entire artist study and how-to post here: Virtual Refrigerator - Gustav Klimt

Autumn Art on the Virtual Refrigerator - an art link-up hosted by Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com
Birch Grove in Autumn by KAT, 2015

And of course - pumpkins! Here are a couple of pumpkin drawings from the past.

Autumn Art on the Virtual Refrigerator - an art link-up hosted by Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com
Pumpkins and Corn Stalks by KAT, 2014

Autumn Art on the Virtual Refrigerator - an art link-up hosted by Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com
Thanksgiving Pumpkin by KAT, 2015

What art projects does autumn inspire for you?
Autumn carries more gold in its pocket than all the other seasons. ~Jim Bishop
Now it's your turn! Join us by sharing your art posts here on the Virtual Fridge!

The Virtual Refrigerator is an art post link-up hosted by Every Bed of Roses, Homeschool Coffee Break, Raventhreads, and This Day Has Great Potential #VirtualFridge #art

Grab a virtual magnet and add your link here to share your child's art or your arts and crafts how-to posts. Please visit the other blogs and admire what's on their Virtual Refrigerators!







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 ©2006-2016 Homeschool Coffee Break. All rights reserved. All text, photographs, artwork, and other content may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form without the written consent of the author. http://kympossibleblog.blogspot.com/

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Strategies for Stretching Your Homeschool Dollar on The Homeschool Post

This post contains affiliate links - using affiliate links from Homeschool Coffee Break helps fuel this blog and our homeschool - thank you! 
5 Strategies for Stretching Your Homeschool Dollar - keeping the cost of homeschooling under control! Here are some tips to help - on The Homeschool Post @ hsbapost.com courtesy of Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

Homeschooling can put a dent in our pocketbooks, and it's so tempting to spend more on cool things than the budget might allow. Many homeschool families are living on one income, and few of us have the kind of homeschool budget that allows us to buy every shiny new thing that catches our eye. There's not just curriculum to consider, but field trips, extra classes, sports, music lessons, and more that we need or want to spend money on. I've heard that it's possible to homeschool for free using the library and the internet, and I believe that's probably true. For me - and I think for many homeschoolers - we simply want to stretch our limited homeschool dollars as wisely as possible. 

Join me for 5 Strategies to help do just that - on The Homeschool Post.

Do you have tips to share for keeping homeschool costs manageable? Leave a comment and let me know!


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 ©2006-2016 Homeschool Coffee Break. All rights reserved. All text, photographs, artwork, and other content may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form without the written consent of the author. http://kympossibleblog.blogspot.com/

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Book Review: The Pray-ers

Book Review: The Pray-ers - A Homeschool Coffee Break Review for the Homeschool Review Crew @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

Recently I was given the chance to read and review a new novel that focuses on the power of prayer. The Pray-ers / Book 1 Troubles is the debut novel from Mark S. Mirza, and is published by CTM Publishing Atlanta.

The Pray-ers / Book 1 Troubles
Author Mark S. Mirza is the founder of Common Thread Ministries, which offers coaching and help to individuals and churches in prayer. He leads the men's prayer ministry for Dr. Charles Stanley at First Baptist Church in Atlanta, but still Mirza admits that prayer doesn't come easily to him, but is something that needs constant work and practice. He is a speaker and teacher in the area of prayer, and now brings his insight to readers in this novel that teaches about prayer and spiritual warfare in a story setting.

The Pray-ers / Book 1 Troubles

In The Pray-ers, readers are introduced to three main characters living in different eras of history. Although living in different centuries, their stories form a set of parallels, as each is a prayer warrior facing difficult circumstances of their own. Although the trials experienced by each character are different, they are related in that they are learning similar lessons about prayer and faith, and the battles "behind the scenes" in the spiritual realm are very much the same.

Each chapter is titled with the time frame, so it's pretty easy to keep track of who's who. A cast of demons and angels have their parts to play as well. Of course the demons are trying to distract the pray-ers from developing an effective prayer life, and are trying to destroy them with discouragement, with opposition, and with gossip and other attacks on their character. A guardian angel named Hael is allowed to make contact with the pray-ers from time to time, in order to strengthen their faith and bring them encouragement.

There are a couple of things that the author does differently from most works of fiction, and he explains the reasoning in the preface. He doesn't capitalize the names of the demons, and this takes a bit of getting used to when reading. The other thing that is unusual for a work of fiction is the inclusion of footnotes. These are found throughout the book, and with few exceptions they are the references for Scriptures quoted or alluded to in the narration or dialogue. Personally, I found this to be overdone and distracting, but I think it's a matter of preference. A list of characters and the pronunciation of the unusual names is found at the back of the book.

A brief overview of the intertwined storylines:
  • In the first century, Epaphras (mentioned in Paul's letters as the leader of the church at Colossae) acts as mentor to his nephew Thales and teaches him about prayer, faith, and obedience. Thales begins a friendship with the daughter of a Jewish merchant who happens to be related to Caiaphas (the high priest involved in Jesus' crucifixion). This merchant is strongly opposed to those who follow The Way.
  • In the nineteenth century, Brother Alexander Rich is an itinerant preacher in Georgia. He is doing his best to faithfully minister to the folks in several small towns, but the demons think they can destroy him using misunderstandings, rumors, gossip, and suspicion.
  • In the current era, Dr. Dale is a track coach and the leader of a thriving men's prayer ministry. In his portion of the story, there is a Christian student being unfairly treated by a psychology professor who is antagonistic towards Christianity. Dale also acts as mentor to a man leading a new group in the prayer ministry, and Dale's wife Margie leads a prayer group for young female students at the university. Dale and Margie have their own difficult circumstances to face too.
It is evident that Mr. Mirza is a very knowledgeable teacher and is passionate about encouraging Christians to get serious about their prayers. I haven't heard him speak, but my impression is that he is a gifted communicator and speaker. The idea of presenting Biblical teaching and principles of prayer within a novel setting is a great one; and I found many aspects of the fictional stories and the teaching on prayer to be timely and insightful. It was instructive to see how characters prayed the Scriptures, and a good reminder that the spiritual realm is very real, even though we seldom see with our eyes the evil schemes the enemy uses against us or the spiritual warfare going on around us.

I do wish that an editor had taken a heavier hand in polishing the final manuscript. The author explained his preference to not capitalize the names of demons, and that made sense to me; and although I didn't personally care for the practice of including all the footnotes, I understand and appreciate the reasoning for that as well. However, there were a great many places where misplaced quotation marks and missing commas hampered readability; and there were other minor problems throughout that I would expect a thorough editor to correct. The three main characters seemed to be basically the same character in different settings - which I think is somewhat intentional, but also gave me the impression that characters hadn't been well-developed, because with only two exceptions they all spoke the same way. I found the dialogue was often choppy and unrealistic to my way of thinking, and that characters in the earlier historic settings used modern-day colloquialisms that wouldn't have been in use during their time. (Granted, the first century characters wouldn't have been speaking English at all, would they? All the same, simple terms like "okay" or referring to children as "kids" are a bit out of place in the conversations of first or nineteenth century folk.) Smoothing out the awkward sections of narration and correcting the grammar and punctuation problems would make the book more appealing to readers. I hate to say it, but if I had not been committed to reading the entire novel for this review, I would have been frustrated by the mechanics during the first several chapters and would have given up. As it is, I'm glad I carried on because not only did the stories get better as I went, but I was able to bottle my inner editor and grammar-nerd and focus on the principles of prayer being demonstrated.

What I liked best:

  • The principles being taught through the examples of the characters are firmly grounded in Scripture, and (although they were too much for me) the footnotes allow the reader to check for themselves.
  • It's a unique way of teaching about praying!

What I need to mention:

  • I've already mentioned my disappointment with incorrect punctuation, awkwardly constructed passages of narration, and undeveloped dialogue. I would love to see an updated edition of the book with corrections, and my hope is that the second book in the series will be better edited.
  • My preference would be to see far fewer footnotes, but perhaps a discussion guide in the back of the book that would include these references.
  • The author does state in the Preface that the primary purpose of the book is to teach rather than to entertain, and I think this is important to keep in mind.

My bottom line: I started out expecting a good historical novel that featured great examples of powerful and effective prayer. Having read the book, I think a better description would be an abundance of strong teaching and examples of effective prayer presented in a story setting rather than in a non-fiction book of instruction. It may seem a subtle distinction, but it made a difference in forming my opinion of this book. If you read it, be prepared to look past the need for another editing session and make up your mind to learn how to be a better pray-er as you see the example of the characters. I think it's appropriate for readers from young adult up who would enjoy receiving in-depth teaching on how to pray effectively from a story. 

The Pray-ers / Book 1 Troubles

Would you like to spend some time with The Pray-ers? Here's what you need to know:
Visit the website: http://www.ThePray-ers.com/

Pricing: The paperback is available for $23.95 and the ePub download for $4.99. Visit the website's Buy Now page for all the links and further information.

You can follow The Pray-ers on Facebook and on Twitter.

Visit the Homeschool Review Crew blog for more information and to read other reviews.

The Pray-ers / Book 1 Troubles

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I have done my best to provide accurate pricing and links at the time this post originally appeared. Please be aware that these may change.

Monday, September 19, 2016

From the High School Lesson Book - Setting Goals and Measuring Success

This post contains affiliate links - using affiliate links from Homeschool Coffee Break helps fuel this blog and our homeschool - thank you!
From the High School Lesson Book - Setting Goals and Measuring Success on Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

We're now a couple of weeks into our homeschool year, and are fine tuning our routines and expectations. There have been successes as well as things that we've realized we'll need to change or work on harder. This morning I finished a session of entering grades and updating lesson plans on the Homeschool Tracker Online, so I'm in a grading and evaluation mindset right now.

How we measure our progress and success has definitely changed over the years! One way it's changed is in how specific we are about our goals and the target dates for reaching them. I think that's just a natural progression as we move from the elementary and beginner stages of homeschooling into the high school years. In the early years, the goals were broad and the 'deadlines' were very flexible. The educational goals included: learning to read; learning how to research and find answers to questions of all kinds; making the connections between things learned in school to the real world and everyday life; and establishing a solid foundation in the Scriptures for their faith. 

Commit to the Lord whatever you do and he will establish your plans. (Proverbs 16:3) From the High School Lesson Book - Setting Goals and Measuring Success on Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

As we moved into high school years we had some more specific goals. Overall, we were still aiming for the ability to learn independently and apply knowledge practically; but there were more details included in the goals. A certain number of credits in specific subjects, a minimum grade earned before moving on, and a set number of hours or percentage completed in a textbook in order to earn credit. And a little less flexibility in the deadlines by which these things were to be achieved.

Our goals, academically - for graduation
4 English credits
3 Social Studies credits
3 Math credits
2 Science credits
2 Bible credits
1 Phys.Ed. credit
1 Technology credit
1 Fine Arts credit
1/2 Health credit
5-1/2 Elective credits

When we're using a high school level curriculum or textbook, it's quite easy to tell whether the work is completed and what grade is earned. For subjects like Phys.Ed. and Fine Arts, we log hours (in gym class or other sports, and in music lessons), so those are pretty straight-forward as well, although the grading is much more subjective.

When it comes to real world readiness, we have some goals there too. A few years ago, my blog hop series about Homeschool Essentials for Graduating highlighted the things I felt were essential for students to accomplish or learn before the end of their high school years. Besides completing their coursework and credits so their high school transcript meets requirements to enter the college or career they've chosen, I think it's important for them to know how to manage a household and have real world skills for getting (and keeping!) a job and being good citizens. Most importantly, I believe they must be firmly grounded in Biblical faith before they graduate.

Homeschooling High School - Graduation and Beyond! on Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com #homeschool #highschool #grad

Some of those things are a little harder to evaluate and measure success.

Although we choose our high school coursework with an eye to the standard requirements for graduation, we still believe in providing well-rounded and well-grounded education.  We try to cover a broad range of subject areas, and all from a Biblical worldview. Hopefully they "learn how to learn" so they can find their own answers when they need to. When I see that they take the initiative to find out about things they are interested in, then I can mentally check off that box. 

The real-world skills they are learning include practical knowledge and using common sense. Teens aren't naturally very good at that, it seems! They should know how to do things like balance a checkbook, manage their resources, run a household, make their own plans to prepare for further education and their chosen career; and they need to be able to get along with all kinds of people and maintain healthy relationships. I can tell if they know how to handle their money, prepare meals, and do household chores. Choosing a career path and getting launched on it has an individual timeline that's different for everyone. It was easier on us as parents with the son that knew what he wanted to pursue and found the school that would get him started. Then there's the kids that graduate high school without knowing exactly what they want to do next. There's uncertainty so it isn't always a comfortable place to be, but we try to encourage and help motivate without imposing our own wishes; and trust that we'll be able to check that box off in time as well. And in the meantime, we are encouraged to see and hear that they are demonstrating strong work ethics and respect.

Checking off the box that they've got a solid faith is actually not my job. Our job as parents is to teach them as best I can and bring them up "in the way they should go" (Proverbs 22.6) and "in the training and instruction of the Lord" (Ephesians 6:4). It's also our responsibility to disciple them and set good examples. It's their job to own their faith and to live it out. But it's awesome to know that they have professed faith and been baptized, and to see them grow in the Lord. As we see that they are participating in the life of the church, and using their individual gifts and talents in ministry, we have confidence that God is at work in their lives.
And I am sure of this, that he who began a good work in you will bring it to completion at the day of Jesus Christ. ~Philippians 1:6
How do you measure success in your homeschool? Leave a comment and let me know! Then please link your posts about homeschooling high school here - I'd love to see what you are working on! Also, please visit your neighbors and leave some encouraging comments!




If you're homeschooling through high school you may also join my Blog Roll.


 ©2006-2016 Homeschool Coffee Break. All rights reserved. All text, photographs, artwork, and other content may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form without the written consent of the author. http://kympossibleblog.blogspot.com/

Friday, September 16, 2016

Homeschool Weekly - Finding Our Groove Edition

This post contains affiliate links - using affiliate links from Homeschool Coffee Break helps fuel this blog and our homeschool - thank you!

Homeschool Weekly - Finding Our Groove Edition on Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

Homeschool news  . . . Overall, I think this was a pretty good week. Not that we got everything done that I'd hoped for, but I felt like we were settled into a pretty good groove and even on the days when I had to go out, Kennady (mostly) was good about working on school. If I'm not mistaken, we hit every subject this week, although we waited till the last minute to get Science done. Putting the "pro" in "procrastinate"!

I left it pretty late this school year, but I gave some thought to our School Scripture and finally decided that it would be okay to have two verses, since I had trouble deciding between these two.

Homeschool Weekly - Finding Our Groove Edition on Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

Homeschool Weekly - Finding Our Groove Edition on Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

Other news . . . Harrison was home for a quick visit last weekend, arriving around lunchtime on Saturday. He didn't spend a lot of time at home though, since he had plenty to pack into just a couple days! Saturday evening was another ballgame in the Summer of Landon series, and Harrison went along with Landon, the hubster, and a couple of friends to the Washington Nationals game. On Sunday afternoon, we all attended the beautiful wedding of one of Harrison's very good friends.

On Monday morning, I went with the pastor and a couple of good friends from church to pay a visit to one of the members who was in hospice care. It was a true blessing to be able to spend some time with this man and his family, praying and singing some of his favorite gospel songs. Just how special that time was became even more evident the next day when we received word that he had passed away.

Homeschool Weekly - Finding Our Groove Edition on Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

I was back at choir rehearsals this week, and Kennady started guitar lessons for the season. On Wednesday evening we had the kickoff for the youth and kids mid-week programs at church, and then we still had our worship team practice afterwards! Then on Thursday evening, Kennady and I were really glad to get back to Ladies Theme Nights with friends at church. We've missed that over the past several months.


What I'm Learning . . .  I'm trying to get into a better habit of time management for myself as we figure out how to organize our school days. I've been reminded that I don't often guess right when I estimate how long a certain task will take, and that I tend to get caught up in working on something for "just a minute longer" than turns into a half hour longer before I know it!

The necessity and power of prayer has really been brought home to me over the past couple of weeks as well. I'm almost finished reading a book called The Pray-ers (for a review coming next week) that highlights praying the Scriptures and that spiritual warfare is going on around us all the time. Of course that's always happening, but with some of the things going on in our lives recently, I'm even more aware.

Homeschool Weekly - Finding Our Groove Edition on Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

I recommend . . . checking out our Mixed Bag fundraising sale. They have so much cool stuff and it's different from the same-old-same-old. Kennady's chorus is doing a Mixed Bag fundraiser to help chorus members pay their way for chorus trips, and she is saving for the big trip to a choral festival in New Orleans in June. If you're curious, my link will take you to the online store; and if you find something you'd like to order, would you leave a comment so I can contact you? That way I can give you the ID info so that Kennady gets the credit.

mixed bag fundraiser - www.mixedbagdesigns.com/?fundraiserid=74965

And I also recommend SchoolhouseTeachers.com, as always. Remember the special pricing until the end of this month!



On my blogs last week . . .

Here on Homeschool Coffee Break:

52 Lists #37 - Shopping List
Virtual Refrigerator - A New Spin on Art
From the High School Lesson Book - School Scripture

A New Spin on Art on the Virtual Fridge - Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com

And on my book blog, Just A Second:

Recent Reads - Charity's Cross
Wordless Wednesday - First Day Pictures
Teaser Tuesday - Charity's Cross
What I'm Reading - September 12, 2016
Scripture and a Snapshot - A Spring of Water

Just A Second is where I share book reviews and other book-related things, and update on what's on my bookshelf. This week I finished and reviewed Charity's Cross (Charles Towne Belles) (Volume 4) by MaryLu Tyndall; and I've been reading:
A parting shot . . . these baby bunnies had a lucky escape when mowed our lawn this week! Fortunately the hubster noticed them trying to run for cover after their nest was disturbed, and he settled them back down. None lost on our watch!

Homeschool Weekly - Finding Our Groove Edition on Homeschool Coffee Break @ kympossibleblog.blogspot.com




 Weekly Wrap-Up   Biblical Womanhood - Christian Fellowship Weekend

  

I will be linking up at the Weekly Wrap-Up hosted by Weird, Unsocialized Homeschoolers, at Christian Fellowship Weekend hosted by Biblical Womanhoodand at The Homeschool Mother's Journal hosted by NextGenHomeschool.

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